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Important Immigrant Votes (2017)

Presentation by Karthick Ramakrishnan, director of AAPI Data, to webinar participants of seminar on the AAPI Vote, organized by NonProfit Vote. October 19, 2017. Highlights the rapid growth of the AAPI population, as well as opportunities and challenges with respect to voting and other forms of civic engagement.
Temple University Press (2004)

The contributors to this volume examine recent social, political, technological, and intellectual changes to provide the newest research in the field.
Asian American Center for Advancing Justice (2014)

A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in the Midwest compiles the latest data on Asian Americans and NHPIs in the West.

Routledge (2004)

Using data from the 2000-2001 Multi City Asian American Political Survey, this book describes the political characteristics of Asian Americans.
Routledge (2009)

The 'bilingual ballot' provisions of the Voting Rights Act, enacted in 1965 and expanded a decade later to remove language barriers to voting by prohibiting English-only elections in certain jurisdictions, remain a subject of intense debate in election law and American politics.
Rutgers University Press (2006)

In Race, Rights, and the Asian American Experience, Angelo N. Ancheta demonstrates how United States civil rights laws have been framed by a black-white model of race that typically ignores the experiences of other groups, including Asian Americans.
Center for American Progress and AAPI Data (2014)

With respect to the size of government, Asian Americans are more likely than the U.S. average to prefer an activist government that provides more services than a smaller government that provides fewer services.
National Asian American Survey and AAPI Data (2015)

This presentation answers some important questions about the Asian American electorate in California, including the relevance of immigration to the Asian American vote.
AAPIData and Center for American Progress (2014)

Since 2004, there has been continued strong growth in the Asian American electorate with more than 500,000 new voters added every four years with a growth rate of 21 percent in 2008 and 16 percent in 2012.
PNAAPS (2001)

The dataset is based on a Pew Research Center telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,511 Asian Americans conducted from January 3 to March 27, 2012, in English and seven Asian languages; the sample was designed to enable findings to be reported about each of the six largest country of origin subgroups: Chinese Americans, Filipino Americans, Indian Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Korean Americans and Japanese Americans as well as about the Asian-American population as a whole.
National Asian American Survey (2012)

Between 2000 and 2010, the Asian American population grew faster than any other racial group, at a rate of 46%.
National Asian American Survey (2012)

Two-thirds of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders voted for President Obama, yet about half are independent or do not think in terms of political party.
University of Michigan Press (2006)

This book argues that low levels of political participation among immigrants are not due to apathy or preoccupation with homeland politics, but rather to the inability of American political parties and advocacy organizations to mobilize immigrant voters.
Stanford University Press (2005) This book examines Asian American voting behavior in the context of larger comparisons, across racial groups and immigrant generations, to arrive at a systematic understanding of how home country origins and U.S.-related factors matter for voter turnout.
PS: Political Science and Politics (2001)

Only in the last decade have a number of surveys (collected mostly at the local or regional level) been taken, reflecting expanded interest in the growing Asian-American population and the development of ethnic sampling and interviewing techniques.
Russell Sage Foundation (2011)

This book examines political participation along 5 key dimensions, including voting, political donations, writing elected officials, community organizing, and protesting, using data from the first national survey of Asian Americans.
Dubois Review (2009)

In this article, we analyze the importance of race-based considerations in the Asian American vote, after controlling for other factors such as partisanship, issue preferences, age, and gender.
National Asian American Survey (2008)

The National Asian American Survey (NAAS) conducted the first nationally representative survey of the policy priorities and issue preferences of Asian Americans in 2008.
Pew Center (2012)

The dataset is based on a Pew Research Center telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,511 Asian Americans conducted from January 3 to March 27, 2012, in English and seven Asian languages; the sample was designed to enable findings to be reported about each of the six largest country of origin subgroups: Chinese Americans, Filipino Americans, Indian Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Korean Americans and Japanese Americans as well as about the Asian-American population as a whole.